Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective. Books 2019-03-01

Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective Rating: 9,8/10 1284 reviews

Thoughts without a thinker : psychotherapy from a Buddhist perspective (Book, 2013) [tinnitusarchive.org]

Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective

Don't read it for quick fix techniques or immediate go-dos or even learn how to meditate. I've read it once and have started it again. Notwithstanding, I think this book must have been ground breaking when first written and thankfully what Epstein saw as a trend for collusion between traditional western psychiatry and Buddhist psychology today appears to continue. This is definitely a book to come back to as I expect my mind and body was in the wrong place for it at the time, and I found it too scientific and not quite what I was looking for in order to attempt to try and quieten my mind down. During such painful moments, you have access to your innermost truth and are able to see how you are clutching to the illusion of self, causing yourself to suffer in the process. It is exactly through these kinds of techniques that Easterners have achieved and humility. Clearly written and very accessible, this enlightening guide explains the unique psychological contributions of the teachings of Buddhism, describes the path of meditation in contemporary psychological language, and lays out the possibility of a meditation-inspired psychotherapy.

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Thoughts Without a Thinker Summary

Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective

His is also a good book to read if you are working on your own mindfulness and meditation practice and hope to move beyond the sense of self that you cling to and the cravings that bring you suffering. How long will the file be downloaded? Obviously, the subject matter will be interesting to a limited audience, but if this review piques your curiosity, I would recommend it. Epstein makes a connection between Buddhist philosophy and psychotherapy, the Self versus the absence of the Self. Drawing on his own experiences as patient, meditator, and therapist, Mark Epstein argues that the contemplative traditions of the East help patients go beyond merely recognizing their problems to healing them. What it did for me was to take a newly emergent exploration of Buddhism as a way forward out of the nightmare of depression and addiction and confirm it as true north.

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Thoughts without a thinker : psychotherapy from a Buddhist perspective (Book, 2013) [tinnitusarchive.org]

Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective

This could be true, but is unlikely. Other Books by Mark Epstein Learn more about this book also written by Mark Epstein. The book will take its place among the classics of the literature of meditation. Far from being at odds with the psychodynamic method, such an approach is in fact just what the doctor might order. You left your Garden of Eden the moment your mother stopped breastfeeding you! Epstein also avoids the often breathless tone writers often seem to fall into when describing the nearly miraculous effects they inevitably find when they integrate Buddhist meditative techniques and approaches into the psychotherapeutic process.

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Thoughts Without a Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective

Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective

He argues convincingly that in many cases, therapy can take a patient only so far, while therapy coupled with Buddhist meditation can take that patient so much further. Also gave me a huge insight into Freud which was new to me. This latter step, the core of Buddha's teaching, is seen as an opportunity for final freedom. Specifically, the clinical examples show the potential usefulness of mindfulness meditation in the psychotherapy of selected patients. A landmark contribution to the field of psychoanalysis, Thoughts Without a Thinker describes the unique psychological contributions offered by the teachings of Buddhism. The wheel of life : a Buddhist model of the neurotic mind -- Humiliation : the Buddha's first truth -- Thirst : the Buddha's second truth -- Release : the Buddha's third truth -- Nowhere standing : the Buddha's fourth truth -- pt.

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Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective

On one hand, Epstein navigates the history and ethos of Buddhist philosophy with a rich clarity and writing style that truly carried me, effortlessly, across the pages. They are black holes that absorb fear and create the defensive posture of the isolated self, unable to make satisfying contact with others or with the world. Bare attention gets rid of all the critical self-talk that can bog a person down in the spatial self. A landmark contribution to the field of psychoanalysis, Thoughts Without a Thinker describes the unique psychological contributions offered by the teachings of Buddhism. I have heard many people say they have tried meditation and given up because they could never completely clear their minds and transcend into that blissful oceanic state.

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Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective by Mark Epstein

Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective

It's almost palpable that Epstein isn't trying to sell an idea or more books or an argument. In it, Mark Epstein argues that the contemplative traditions of the East can be extremely beneficial to patients, not just in helping them recognize their problems, but by giving them the strength to heal. On one hand, Epstein navigates the history and ethos of Buddhist philosophy with a rich clarity and writing style that truly carried me, effortlessly, across the pages. Download and start listening now! The format is clear, but - myself - I am not a trained, schooled psychologist. The key message in this book: Both Buddhism and psychoanalysis can shed light on the ways human beings suffer. The book focuses attention on the critical ontological issue of the nature of self. Ok, so here I was, walking down the streets of Ghent, out to return some books to the library, was just doing my usual streetwalking routine, which is basically just walking through streets thinking about all these different lives passing me by, in these places that never look the same when I decide to turn around.

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Thoughts Without a Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective

Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective

Thoughts Without a Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective By Mark Epstein, Reviewed by Stan Rockwell, PsyD, Psychcentral. Mitchell, author of Can Love Last? Epstein does a remarkable job of explaining the principles of both the Freudian and the Buddhist system. Part of the issue is that I'm skeptical of Freud's theories. He uses eastern and western methods in his counseling psychology practice. Everything which happened afterward — sorry to break this to you! Epstein begins with a review of Buddhist psychology and the way of living.

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Thoughts Without a Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective

Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective

The sun was shining here and there, showing me where I could be walking. A bit much to ask for, given the perceived wisdom prevailing during the 80's a While many years of therapy that involved delving back into a horrendous childhood and service in 3 wars helped me to identify the issues it did not help me to deal with them. In this way, he continually attempts to transpose the vastness of Buddhist methodology i. Fascinating; the only problem is that now I want to read more about psychotherapy and Freud, and there just aren't enough hours in the day! In doing so, the enjoyment of his perspective on Buddhist philosophy is countered by his insistence on returning to h This was a remarkably perplexing read. This was a remarkably perplexing read. He is a past chair of professional development for the Virginia Counselors Association. But there are many schools of Buddhism, depending on how Buddha's words are interpreted.

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Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective by Mark Epstein

Thoughts Without A Thinker: Psychotherapy From A Buddhist Perspective

Overanalyzing things to find an impractical answer. Mark Epstein has given us a brilliant account of how an ancient science of mind, based on a rich meditative tradition, can complement therapy and lead to new dimensions of wisdom and wholeness. Instead, realize that such emotions are a natural part of being human. Kort sagt noe av det smarteste jeg har lest; briljant fusjonering av vestens psykologi og Buddahs lære, på en måte som forsterker begge perspektiver og viser hvordan de kan - og må - sameksistere om en skal oppnå vekst. The writer is really, really smart. Think of a situation when someone yelled at you! My own work as a therapist has included an underlying Eastern philosophy.

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