Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power. a book review by Stephen Roulac: Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power 2019-02-21

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power Rating: 7,1/10 391 reviews

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

Duis ut nisl in mi eleifend faucibus egestas aliquet arcu. His relationship with John Adams was also interesting. Therefore it is good to occasionally be reminded of how great Jefferson really was. A few years ago I had the chance to visit Monticello, Jefferson's home in Virginia, and I've been interested This is a marvelous biography of Thomas Jefferson, who is arguably America's most complicated Founding Father. This constitutional see-saw battle helped hone the precedent of executive decision-making and legislative agreement. In this magnificent biography, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of American Lion and Franklin and Winston brings vividly to life an extraordinary man and his remarkable times.

Next

Listen to Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham at tinnitusarchive.org

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

Meacham argues that Jefferson's passion with the written word acted to propel the revolutionary movement forward as he helped to create the ideas behind the Declaration of Independence and penned the final document himself. A thrilling and affecting portrait of our first philosopher-politician. Jefferson's views could appeal to those across the political spectrum, for they were rooted not in strict ideology, but in nation building and sovereignty. Jefferson had struck the deal he could strike, and, for the moment, America was the stronger for it. Kudos to the author on that. He was, and he does, and Meacham's book is a good reminder of that.

Next

Review of “Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power” by Jon Meacham

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

This is the most affecting part of Mr. When I was about to write this short review I looked at Wikipedia. The father of the ideal of individual liberty, of the Louisiana Purchase, of the Lewis and Clark expedition, and of the settling of the West, Jefferson recognized that the genius of humanity—and the genius of the new nation—lay in the possibility of progress, of discovering the undiscovered and seeking the unknown. Fascinating portrayal of our third president, a man of startling contradictions. My head makes me read nonfiction. Be wary of the ideologue who self-servingly quotes this founding father -- for likely his pearls of phrase on equality or gun rights or states rights are often more costumed in reality. As a member of the opposition party and vice president during the Adams Administration, Jefferson vigorously opposed the Alien and Sedition Acts as a blot on the liberty and freedom promised by the Bill of Rights.

Next

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham on Apple Books

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

A man who served in Virginia's state government, then as governor, vice-president, secretary of state, ambassador to France, a two-term president, and late in his life, the founder of the University of Virginia. It said it all about him. Yes, he had many talents but do his talents excuse his lack of character? It was a crucial friendship, and a unique one: a president and a prime minister spending enormous amounts of time together and exchanging nearly two thousand messages. We're shown how he gathered his extended family around him all his life. Thomas Jefferson's gentle, congenial, and highly intelligent manner belied a steely conviction that served us well.

Next

Listen to Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham at tinnitusarchive.org

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

With this biography, Meacham appears to continue to float in that narrative sphere between popular journalist-historians Alter, Woolfe and popular academic-historians Ellis, Kearns Goodwin, Morris. Author Meacham presents Jefferson as a man of power and control. This focus doesn't restrict Meacham, and he has adeptly editted massive amounts of information about this enigmatic man into a book that still has some new revelations, but the author does take advantage of this focus to pussy-foot around some of the more contradictory elements associated with Jefferson. At times I thought I was reading a fiction story. To be fair, I recognize that much of my dislike of this book comes from the fact that I feel the themes the author highlights are the usual things that get beaten to death where Jefferson is concerned: his debt, Sally Hemings, bypassing his original need for a constitutional amendment to enact the Louisiana purchase, playacting as a 'regular ole Joe' when president.

Next

Jon Meacham

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

For those just starting out with the founding fathers I think there is a lot of value here. But how did he do it? This authorship saw him gain much favour within the Colonies, but he became a hunted man by the British Red Coats. Unless you've been living off the grid for two years, you know we live in trying political times, both in America and around the world. Jefferson, who had been gravely ill for a few weeks, literally willed himself to live until he saw July 4th arrive. In all of these works I have been searching for the source of his publicly perceived greatness. I'm still a 'newbie' when it comes to reading about our past presidents--certainly not even close to being a historian. The author shows a definite slant toward Jeffersonian politics and you get a distinct dislike for some of the other major players of the time.

Next

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

He didn't think that white folks and black folks could live together, but kept one of his slaves as a concubine. So he convened a dinner. When Lincoln emerged as the victor, his rivals were dismayed and angry. Adams was his friend and he stabbed this friend in the back to advance his interests. Meacham accomplishes his goal to some extent, but only at the cost of playing down many of Jefferson's major foibles. For Jefferson laziness was a sin.

Next

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power (Audiobook) by Jon Meacham

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

In all of these works I have been searching for the source of his publicly perceived greatness. The father of the ideal of individual liberty, of the Louisiana Purchase, of the Lewis and Clark expedition, and of the settling of the West, Jefferson recognized that the genius of humanity—and the genius of the new nation—lay in the possibility of progress, of discovering the undiscovered and seeking the unknown. As Jon Meacham noted, it seems Jefferson meant only white, land-owning men were created equal. As an executive editor at Random House, he benefits from interaction with the leading authors of the day. Whether the Jefferson-Hemings interaction was based on an amorous connection or strictly a power relationship cannot be definitively known, though Meacham does mention reports of the strong physical resemblance of Hemings' children to Jefferson and how his time on his estate matched with the pregnancies. Jefferson was a man who craved the power to make the world a better place. Of course, at times this brilliantly skillful duality can look perilously like self-contradiction or even hypocrisy.

Next