The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat. Bob Woodward 2019-01-10

The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat Rating: 9,7/10 1781 reviews

The secret man : the story of Watergate's Deep Throat (Book, 2005) [tinnitusarchive.org]

The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat

Nevertheless, Woodward stopped him by Unfortunately, in 1980, Felt was found guilty of authorizing criminal actions against the Weathermen, a fictive group, but was later pardoned by the President. According to the authors, Deep Throat was a key source of information behind a series of articles which introduced the misdeeds of the Nixon administration to the general public. And that's why he lied for 30 years about it. Woodward: It is a little frightening. You might be wondering why Felt was doing all of that.

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The story behind 'Deep Throat'

The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat

The reaction to the Vanity Fair article was mixed. Also, worthy of consideration - how do you respond to what Mark Felt did? He went to the courthouse, expecting a routine police case. A couple of days later in the courtroom, they announced the 18 and a half minute gap. Great addition to the history around Watergate. After this, Felt and Woodward stopped their communication until 2000, when they finally met again. It could be a journalism text for that reason alone. There would have been no way to know which copy was intended for Woodward.

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The Secret Man: The Story of Watergate's Deep Throat by Woodward, Bob: Simon & Schuster, New York, U.S.A. 9780743287159 Hardcover, 1st Edition

The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat

Maybe the denial was so embedded in his persona, his way of life, that he couldn't or didn't want to unlock it. Miller at a news conference in 1981. The Secret Man chronicles the story in intimate detail, from Woodward's first, chance encounter with Felt in the Nixon White House, to their covert, middle-of-the-night meetings in an underground parking garage, to the aftermath of Watergate and decades beyond, until Felt finally stepped forward at age 91 to unmask himself as Deep Throat. Woodward's The Secret Man is in contrast a rather quiet work with much narrower scope. But in the first week in November 1973 I contacted him in order to set up a meeting In the underground garage. Yet it might be true and it is a perhaps more scary to realize how people die years before their bodies quit.

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The Secret Man: The Story of Watergate's Deep Throat (TV Episode 2006)

The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat

As the story progressed, however, the narrative shifted because of the natural passage of time past Watergate, the investigations, and other related events to the larger picture of national security. The mysterious source who helped Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein break open the Watergate scandal in 1972 remained hidden for thirty-three years. Woodward hadn't been in touch with Mark Felt very much until the early 2000s. People were resistant to questions about their toilet paper usage, he discovered, and he couldn't solve the case. No one there to question, doubt or inspire. If its not in inventory, we generally can obtain a quality copy very quickly for you. Reaffirms the vital role that confidential sources play in keeping the public informed.

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The Secret Man The Story of Watergates Deep Throat, Bob Woodward. (Hardcover 0743287150) Used Book available for Swap

The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat

And second: in persecuting political opponents the Nixon's White House was clearly violating the law. If you're unfamiliar with the subject, this would make a nice companion read to. Nonetheless, I respected his daring and courage as more than simply self-serving, but in some way human. The book indicates that Felt must have been very conflicted about revealing secrets to journalists. As a first-class non-fiction suspense it was one of the most fascinating reads of my life. The filmmakers had never seen the real garage.

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The Secret Man Summary: The Watergate Story

The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat

Woodward does not disappoint in reporting what he knows, though his all-too-humanness leads him to give Mark Felt space up to the point at which dementia sets in. At night it's so quiet. Mark Felt didn't have much use for the press. I lied, and insisted to Cohen that he had it wrong. Coincidence shapes people's lives, the reader is told and led to think that - without that accidental meeting - the Watergate affair might have never been fully exposed and the political history might have been quite different.

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The Secret Man The Story of Watergates Deep Throat, Bob Woodward. (Hardcover 0743287150) Used Book available for Swap

The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat

Interesting story telling at the beginning but I was disappointed with the end. Now the world can see what happened and why, bringing to a close one of the last chapters of Watergate. Almost from the beginning, some people suspected Mark Felt. He was also about to be exposed in 1980, when Richard Cohen, a columnist for Firebrand Post, informed Woodward that he would reveal Felt as his source. He had been called by the prosecutors. In the end, The Felt family was contacted, but refused to comment for this story. The chief editor of the Washington Post, who was informed about the true identity, gave him the name he became famous for.

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The story behind 'Deep Throat'

The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat

In an odd way, many, or certainly some, wanted to deliver the goods, the secrets. In telling this story Woodward yet again shines a light on a White House that was rotten all the way to the top. Also revealed was the fact that Woodward's copy of The New York Times had his apartment number indicated on it. The best kept secret in all of journalism was finally disclosed. Both Woodward and the then-current editor of The Washington Post, , denied these claims.

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How ‘Deep Throat’ Took Down Nixon From Inside the FBI

The Secret Man: The Story of Watergates Deep Throat

So many comparable events in today's presidency. Two aspects of the book seem to be the most important. Because Woodward's captive listener turned out to be W. There's a focus that's sorely lacking in most of his books that's present on every page of and , both co-authored with Carl Bernstein. For those who have a family member as I have with this, it's hard not to relate, and I appreciate the way Woodward, the copy editors, and publishers handled what is both an incredible and incredibly familiar story.

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