The dragons gift: the real story of china in Africa. China in Africa: The Real Story: The Dragon's Gift: Translated into Complex Chinese 2019-03-04

The dragons gift: the real story of china in Africa Rating: 5,6/10 1006 reviews

China in Africa: The Real Story: The Dragon's Gift: Translated into Complex Chinese

the dragons gift: the real story of china in Africa

In fact, China's approach is often based on its experience as a recipient of Japanese and Western aid. In that regard, it is insightful and worth reading. Hands down 5 stars for a very fair endeavour to excercise critical thinking and to see both sides of the equation. I have looked for this book in major bookstores and it is never stocked. Yet Africans are benefiting from China's mixture of aid and investment; Western aid officials could learn from it. Or is China helping the developing world pave a pathway out of poverty, as the Chinese claim? Why I finished it: This book was dense with names, places and histories that I didn't know, a wonderful opportunity to learn more. This well-timed book, by one of the world's leading experts, provides the first comprehensive account of China's aid and economic cooperation overseas.

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Buy The Dragon's Gift : The Real Story of China in Africa by Deborah Brautigam (2010, Hardcover) online

the dragons gift: the real story of china in Africa

Having read your other articles I am expecting to find out something a little different to the status quo assumptions on China's policy in the region. The Dragon's Gift corrects the misinformation of both critics and defenders of China's role on the continent. In a very well-structured and data-rich compilation, Brautigam is able to dispel popular myths; for example about China's supposedly negative influence on governance in African states. Bill Gates mentions that he is going to China soon and so he is reading The Dragon's Gift. Riddell, Author of Does Foreign Aid Really Work? But turns out that the West hasn't been free or innocent of these things either. That with the misleading Title Traditional Chinese one really suggests to the readers you're trying to expose the dark sides of Chinese investments in Africa. Data on the matter is scarce, but she estimates that at least 80% of workers employed in Chinese companies are local.

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China in Africa: The Real Story: The Dragon's Gift

the dragons gift: the real story of china in Africa

The African people hope their countries can get investment and new technologies. I have travelled extensively in countries which receive 'The Dragons Gift' and seen in person the empty, ghostly hospitals and irrationally placed abandoned airports it produces. Her most recent book, Will Africa Feed China? Sean Burges in , v. There is a defensive tone to more of the discussion and analysis than is necessary, which stunts both. Rich in vivid anecdotes and informed by the author''s three decades of academic work on both China and Africa, the book does many things, and does them all well.

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China in Africa: The Real Story: The Dragon's Gift

the dragons gift: the real story of china in Africa

Further, she does well to articulate the goals mostly b For the most part, this book accomplished what it set out to do: dispel a lot of rumors and myths. Not only did she cut in half the scholarly estimates of how many people died of starvation during the 'Great Leap Forward' she gave 20 Million, when the most accurate estimate is likely to be 40 Million at least she followed this but stating 'between these two extremes a more pragmatic road prevailed'. The Chinese are linking business and aid in innovative ways. The West simply did not notice the Chinese teams laboring upcountry building small hydropower stations and bridges, repairing irrigation systems, managing state-owned factories, all usually without the kind of billboards other donors favored to advertise their presence. Should they be worried about the massive flows of Chinese aid and investment into the continent, or is this something to be welcomed? Using hard data and a series of vivid stories ranging across agriculture, industry, natural resources, and governance, Brautigam's fascinating book provides an answer. You have natural resources to guarantee a loan? It describes how Chinese engagement in Africa has evolved, identifies its drivers, and assays its emerging impact on both economics and governance in nearly two dozen African states. Brautigam has given us a compelling, objective, and very readable account enlivened by her personal experiences and interviews.

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China in Africa: The Real Story: The Dragon's Gift: Translated into Complex Chinese

the dragons gift: the real story of china in Africa

China's supposedly negative impact on human rights and democracy in Africa is also questionable: While it is true that Chinese investors worry little about such issues, neither do many Western firms. For those interested in China-Africa relations, it enriches the field, defines new research standards and is constructively provocative. I used this book for my capstone paper at school and found it very helpful. Deborah Bräutigam has been writing about the fact and fiction of China and Africa; state-building; governance and foreign aid for more than 20 years. For one thing the book is rather short on conclusions. In some instances, the opposite is true: In Nigeria, Chinese companies are active in all sectors of the economy, while Western companies focus mostly on oil.

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China in Africa: The Real Story: The Dragon's Gift: Translated into Complex Chinese

the dragons gift: the real story of china in Africa

Yet Africans are benefiting from Chinas mixture of aid and investment; Western aid officials could learn from it. He is currently writing a book on Brazil's role in Latin American politics. Unfortunately, it bellies every example of Chinese development that I have seen with my own eyes. In the last few years, China's aid program has leapt out of the shadows. I am sorry, I fail to understand how economic policy which starves 40 Million people to death could in any sense be considered 'pragmatic'. Bräutigam has twice won the Fulbright research award. Chapter 6 is quite technical, but sheds light on one of the major confusions in the field: What counts as aid and what does not.

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China in Africa: The Real Story: The Dragon's Gift: Translated into Complex Chinese

the dragons gift: the real story of china in Africa

Brautigam cautions the reader to not give you much credence to sensational headlines surrounding Chinese business in Africa. I had my first understanding of China-Africa relations during this trip. The author cites a series of incidents in which exaggerated or simply wrong aid figures published in newspapers or magazines made their way into a World Bank report; which suggests that some journalists have an interest in artificially boosting China's influence as this easily makes headlines in the West. When investing in a country or granting aid the Chinese don't make political demands; they don't insist the recipient nation reform its economy to better pay bondholders; they stay for as long is necessary to get a project running and hand it over to the Africans, always ready to return if necessary. They like Chinese products, and use the roads built by Chinese companies. It's a pity because the topic is so useful for today's world.

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Buy The Dragons Gift The Real Story Of China In Africa By Deborah Brautigam

the dragons gift: the real story of china in Africa

Brautigam lucidly explains how Chinese involvement in Africa is not entirely new, though its scale has increased as China has grown economically. I found the book to be very interesting. That being said I do have a few gripes. Manufacturing is a new point of interest for Chinese companies. All I could say is the translator is biased, mischievous, and hating of China.

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